British Empire Article


Charles Morris Woodford


During his years as Resident Commissioner (1896-1915), Woodford was the dominant figure in the Solomon Islands. With very few staff and little money he struggled to extend government authority, mainly by stopping fighting and raiding, and expanded plantation and expatriate economic activity. He supported alienation of land to Europeans, particularly for use as plantations, as a way of increasing revenue. Like many others at that time, Woodford also believed that Solomon Islanders would soon die off, which affected his view of land tenure and the possibility of importing Asian labour, although the latter never eventuated. He expanded his administration from his sole tenure plus police to a permanent European staff of eight or ten, and managed to open regional bases throughout the Protectorate. During his years as Resident Commissioner Woodford continued his interest in ethnology and natural history and he provided small collections for several museums


Tulagi, the capital that was abandoned Article




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