Cornet, Review Order 1868


The dress uniform for hussars after 1855 evolved from a loose-fitting practical uniform to a tighter more formal look towards the end of the century. The blue tunic at this date had no straps on the shoulder so the badges of rank were placed on the front of the collar. Cornets had a silver embroidered star on a blue collar which had a single line of gold lace along the top and a line of gold braid along the edge of the lace. The cuffs were ornamented with gold chain lace in an Austrian knot. The lace had Russia braid following both edges. The same chain lace formed the lines and loops across the chest, along the front and bottom edges of the tunic, and decorating the back seams.

The blue trousers had a double stripe of gold lace, and for mounted duties were booted with black leather which was practical for marching order but not very smart for parades. In 1871 boots and breeches replaced these trousers. The sword, in a steel scabbard had a gold and crimson sword-knot ending in a gold acorn. The Sabretache 1861-70 is suspended by three slim gold-laced straps.

The 8th discarded the full-dress shabraque around this time. The 1864 Dress Regulations specify the horse furniture distinctions for each cavalry regiment and the 8th is included: 'To have on the fore corners, VR and crown in gold; on hind corners, crown over harp, then scroll with motto, with 8 H under it, all gold except harp strings silver'. A painting by Norie of a mounted officer of the 8th shows this blue shabraque with a valise and a black sheepskin, edged red. The Dress Regulations state that the throat plume on the bridle should be the same colour as the busby bag. The bag for the 8th was red but the throat plume is the same as the busby plume, red and white, and remained so until the end of horse mounted parades. The Norie painting shows a black throat plume in 1858.



Uniforms | Regimental details




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by Stephen Luscombe