Private 1751


The Royal Collection has the paintings of David Morier commissioned by the Duke of Cumberland to give us detailed information on the uniforms and regimental distinctions throughout the army of 1751. The mitre cap worn by the private in this painting shows as red but the artist was unaware of a change that had been ordered in 1751. The caps were then to have a blue front. In Percy Sumner's article in the Army Historial Research Journal, vol XV, he says that the artist went over the cap with blue paint to rectify his mistake but that the blue had chipped off in places. The painting was probably cleaned up since he wrote that in 1936 and the red colour restored. The flap at the front is red with the White Horse of Hanover and the motto NEC ASPERA TERRENT around it. His coat is similar to the 1747 coat exhibited in Edinburgh Castle except for the extra white button loops under the red flap on the cuff to make chevron shapes. Also there is a small blue patch on each side of the collar. The shoulder belt for his ammunition bag is white as opposed to buff in most other regiments, and there is no flask cord attached to the belt. The saddle cloth is dark blue with two yellow worsted stripes around the edge. In the rear corners are the blue circles with the Scottish motto NEMO ME IMPUNE LACESSIT inscribed, and inside the circle on a red cloth ground the thistle is embroidered in full colour. George II's cypher is embroidered on the front pistol holster covers, with II D between the yellow stripes. Just above his boots there is a white cloth showing. This was tied onto the knees to reduce wear and tear on the blue breeches. The leather bucket for his musket butt can be seen hanging in front of his boot.


Regimental Details | Uniforms




Share



by Stephen Luscombe