Major Lord Bernard Charles Gordon-Lennox


'A heavy loss this day was the death of Major Lord Bernard Lennox, who was killed by a high explosive shell. For 3 months he had been in the thick of every engagement, always cheerful, and making the best of every hardship. He was one of the most popular officers in the Brigade of Guards, and his death was very keenly felt by everyone.' (Sir F Ponsonby's The Grenadier Guards in the Great War of 1914-1918

Lord Bernard Gordon-Lennox of the 2nd Battalion Grenadier Guards was killed in action at Zillebeke on the 10th November, 1914, was the third son of the seventh Duke of Richmond and Gordon, K.G. Born in London on the 1st May, 1878, he was educated at Eton College and Sandhurst, from which he joined the Grenadier Guards in February, 1898, becoming Lieutenant in October, 1899. He took part in the South African War, being present at the operations in the Orange Free State, including the actions at Poplar Grove and Driefontein, for which he received the Queen's medal with two clasps. From 1904-06 he was seconded for service with the Chinese Regiment at Wei-hai-Wei. He was promoted Captain in 1909, and was A.D.C. from November, 1907, to July, 1909, and Assistant Military Secretary, from August, 1909, to November, 1911, to the General Officer Commanding-in-Chief, Northern Command.

In 1907 Lord Bernard Gordon-Lennox married Evelyn, second daughter of the first Lord Loch, and left two sons: George Charles, born May, 1908; and Alexander Henry Charles, born April, 1911. He was a member of the Guards' and Turf Clubs, and was a thorough all-round sportsman, his principal recreations being shooting, fishing, cricket, and polo. By his death the Army has lost a keen and brilliant officer, and the world of sport an exponent of whom there were very few equals. The Gordon-Lennox family are well known for their service in the Grenadier Guards and there have been many officers of that name on the regimental lists over the years.


Regimental details | Soldiers




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by Stephen Luscombe