Sergeant 1814


This illustration by Bryan Fosten from Wellington's Light Dragoons (Osprey 1982) shows a sergeant of the 20th Light Dragoons with orange facings, and a private of the 22nd Light Dragoons in pink facings. Both figures are included to show the front and back of the uniform which was similar in style for all the light dragoon regiments. This uniform was authorised in 1812 and adopted by units serving abroad as soon as they could be produced and shipped out to them. The shade of the orange facings has been mentioned in connection with the Beechey portrait of Lt-Col Wyndham, as being a browny red colour. The gold lace worn by officers was reflected in the yellow epaulettes and shako decoration of the rank and file. Later uniforms had the sergeants wearing gold to some extent but this conjectural illustration shows yellow worsted material, except for the rank stripes which are gold on facing colour cloth. Around his waist is a girdle of blue and orange stripes.

The black shako was a new form of headdress for the cavalry, to replace the leather Tarleton helmet. It had a short worsted plume at the front, white over red, and a circular shaped yellow device with a regimental button in the middle. The chin scales were brass for the 20th and silvered for the 22nd LD. The 22nd also has a brown shako for hot climate wear. Cap lines linked the shako to the jacket so that it was not lost when it fell off. The pouch-belt was of white leather, with a black pouch and an extension with a spring clip for the carbine. The grey overalls were leathered on the inside leg and around the ankles. Double stripes in the facing colour follow the outer seam. Swords and plain black leather sabretaches were attached to a white leather waist-belt.


Regimental Details | Uniforms




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by Stephen Luscombe